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home | New Journal Writers
 

Articles for New Journal Writers

These articles offer basic journal writing information and are especially helpful to novice journal writers.

Tips for Joy of Writing
Rachel Ballon, Ph.D.
In my writing workshops and private therapy practice I tell both writing students and therapy clients to start a journal. Don't make it one of those fancy ones or one of those expensive handmade books. Buy a notebook and preferably one you can carry around with you at all times. It is a wonderful tool for helping you monitor what you're thinking, feeling, and dreaming about throughout the day and night. Get into the habit of writing in your journal on a daily basis. Record your thoughts, feelings, ideas and even your dreams, both the day and night ones. I wholly recommend journals for non-writers, too. They are a wonderful bridge between your external and internal self. . . . More...
Ten Tips To Jumpstart Your Journaling
Susan Borkin, PhD
Does your journal writing practice need a jumpstart? Use the tips in this J-O-U-R-N-A-L-I-N-G acronym to get yourself going again. . . . More...
Jump-Starting Your Journal: Five Strategies that Work
Kathleen Adams LPC, CCJF
Date every entry. If you only develop one habit in your entire journal life, let it be this one. A journal tracks change over time and process, and dating your entries gives you a running context for your life. It also offers a particular focus: What is going on in your personal universe on this unique day in history? . . . More...
 Tip of the Week
 Journaling Cycle

Think of Journal writing as an ongoing two part cycle

1. The writing process
2. The harvesting process

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